Thursday Doors – Inside the Cathedral

Dear Readers,   I will be moving my blog over the next few days to a new self-hosted site. If all goes well I shall still be linked to my dear WordPress community and nothing much will change except for a new site, my special project and some new avenues to explore ; if I get…

Thursday Doors – A Few Gothic Studs & A Door Knocker

It’s been strange not participating in Thursday Doors this last couple of weeks but at last I’ve had a little free time to get out and about with the camera for a spot of door hunting. A stroll around some of the narrow streets in the old part of the town of Angoulême this week uncovered…

Thursday Doors – Former Glory

I thought I’d share another church door for this week’s Thursday Doors post. Unlike the delightful tiny gem featured last week, this is a large village church which feels a little neglected these days but which must have been quite magnificent centuries ago in its heyday.  Built, as so many of the local churches, during…

Thursday Doors – A Tiny Village Church

There is a tiny hamlet not far from the hillside which despite its diminutive size, boasts a number of lovely old buildings, a ‘town hall’ or Mairie and one of the sweetest little churches I have ever come across. The postage stamp grounds around it are always immaculately kept, the hedges and bushes trimmed and…

Thursday Doors – At the End of the Tunnel

We’re visiting another abbey for my Thursday Doors post this week but this time it is not a ruin but a functioning monastery. The wonderful buildings of the Abbey of Saint Etienne, founded in the year 1003, were home until 3 years ago to 6 missionary monks of the order of Saint Theresa.  These 6…

Thursday Doors – A Village House and Giant Gates

There is a well-known saying that an Englishman’s home is his castle – a love for privacy and a patch of personal territory on our overcrowded island is perhaps the explanation of this notion – but since moving to France we have been more than a little impressed by the Frenchman’s approach to presenting and…

Thursday Doors – The Abandoned Cellar

I’m cheating slightly with my Thursday Doors post this week. The entrance door of my subject building – a long-since abandoned village shop – is certainly old and nicely weatherworn but it’s the doors to the cellar which really caught my eye.   These small doors which give a very limited access from the street to…

Thursday Doors – A Gentle Shade

For this week’s Thursday Doors I’m back to the churches again.  The church itself is another wonderful example dating from the 12th to 13th century but the door this time is rather different. Instead of the ancient heavy oak, the door is a fairly sober painted affair (in a beautiful and very French greeny grey)…

Thursday Doors – Iron Bars and Studs

This is another amazing door from our trip to Périgueux, just a few steps further along Rue Tranquille. I have no idea of the history of this door or the building behind it but it has the same feeling of incredible age and history as my previous example. Perhaps a checkered history in this case…

Thursday Doors – The Abandoned Farm Cottage

My offering for Thursday Doors this week is not exactly pretty and certainly not an impressive example of a door but I found this farm cottage on the edge of a quiet lane a compelling subject for a few photos.  It seemed to be almost out of place amongst the lush vineyards of south western…

Thursday Doors – Curlicues and Rosettes

There is some evidence in a dusty local archive, that way back in the 12th century, the Hillside was the site of a religious ‘paroisse’, the French version of our word ‘parish’. This could mean quite simply that a lone monk lived up here in contemplative seclusion or that he had fellow monks and a…

Thursday Doors – Rue Tranquille

Exploring some of the beautiful, narrow backstreets in the old town of Périgueux in the Dordogne, we came across this stunning ancient doorway.  The heavy oak and iron studded door itself made it more than worthy of a photo but the wonderful carving around the door in the warm local limestone made it something extra…