Thursday Doors – Beauty and the Beastly Cement Works

For my Thursday Doors post this week, I am revisiting a different part of a splendid ensemble of buildings which were once the beautiful Abbey of Notre Dame. After a long and chequered past of good fortune and subsequent destruction during the 100 years’ War and the Wars of Religion, the abbey and its ‘logis’ now have the misfortune to lie next door to the hideous Lafarge cement works. The abbey is a stunning monument to the glorious architecture of the 12th to 16th centuries (with some 17th century revisions), whilst the cement works is a monstrosity of 20th century construction. I thought I would ignore the cement works again – no really, it truly is that ugly – and revisit the 15th/16th century ‘logis’ part of the abbey to show you its stunning, monumental gateway.  If you would like to see more of the 12th century abbey ruins please click here………

La Couronne-6

La Couronne-2

La Couronne abbey close-up

La Couronne

La Couronne-3

Thanks as always to Norm Frampton for this excellent weekly challenge, to see more contributions please click here….  PS Thought I’d better add a photo of the cement works which dominates the skyline for miles around – ghastly…..

La Couronne abbey cement works


ALL PHOTOS © JANE MORLEY

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28 Comments Add yours

  1. Timothy Price says:

    Beautiful architecture. But now that you have discussed the beastly cement plant more than once, you need to give us a look at the ugly side of things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I just added a photo of the cement works to the post – it really isn’t pretty! 😀

      Like

  2. Timothy Price says:

    It looks like it could have been use as a set in the film Metropolís.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It does doesn’t it! 😦 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sue says:

    What splendid architecture! I really am going to have to come and meet you and go photographing in your neck of the woods! By the way, you have made the brutalist cement works look less ugly by using the POV through the trees, and monochrome!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hiya Sue! Yes there really are some beautiful buildings around here, I should have made the cement works look uglier but didn’t have anything close enough to show it at its best worst! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Really lovely. Too bad about the cement works.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Sherry Lynn – real shame isn’t it! I believe however that the cement works are obliged to protect the abbey ruins as they own part of it now, so at least that is a good thing!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful selection of photos, Jane. You are so right about that cement works. If I was an alien and had landed there for my first visit to earth, I would think the abbey was the modern building and the cement works was from a less advanced era. Surely such a huge monstrosity could have been built to blend in a little with the surrounding architecture? It only takes a bit of imagination and forethought.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely Jean, some-one described it as ‘brutalist’ and that pretty much sums it up for me. So little of architectural beauty from recent years to pass on to future generations! Only good thing is the cement works are obliged to protect the abbey ruins as they own part of it, crying shame though!

      Like

      1. Good description. Brutalis architecture.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Norm 2.0 says:

    Lovely shots as usual Jane. I always wonder when I see industrial plants go up next to historical treasures: Was anybody thinking, before they decided to put that beast there?! Arghh!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheers Norm, I reckon these buildings belong to a time of ‘town planning’ when no-one cared a knot as long as it made money – Arghh indeed!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ghastly is a good word to describe that being so close to such a beautiful building. The iron work is truly amazing and a real work of art. Lovely. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheers Judy! It is definitely a case of the good the bad and the ugly ! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. svtakeiteasy says:

    Beautiful, Jane. The ironwork is stunning too.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. So beautiful! From an other era.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Josee, They were rather better at architecture in those days than now I think!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. facetfully says:

    Beautiful, as always!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much facetfully!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Oh my – that cement works is truly hideous! What a shame that it’s right next to such a beautiful structure. Thank you for sharing such wonderful pictures of the abbey.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It really is frightful Deb but at least the abbey and buildings are still standing, glad you like them!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, whenever I see horrible new buildings next to the old, I’m always grateful that the old are still there.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Jane. The cement works looks a bit like a brutalist castle. You give it a very sympathetic treatment. I bet it’s a lot worse looking in the flesh. How strange that it was built on top of a hill so all around could see it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HI Miles, yes I’m afraid I couldn’t resist toning it down a little! It is very large and sprawling and totally hideous, heaven knows how it was allowed to be constructed where it is, France can be strange sometimes!

      Liked by 1 person

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