Thursday Doors – Entrance gates – Charente style

One of my favourite blog discoveries of last year was Norm Frampton’s Thursday Door challenge – there is just something so intriguing about a good door, all the mystery and possibilities concealed behind them. Finding suitable subjects to submit for this weekly event has become such a part of my blogging routine that I find I’ve really missed it these last few weeks when lack of time has prevented me from participating. So as the new year is already well underway and I still haven’t had the opportunity to get out and about on a door hunting trip, I thought I’d better begin with an example closer to home, not a door exactly but a typical traditional entrance gateway of the local area.

This “porche”, as it is known in French, was built from local cut limestone back in the early 19th century and is lucky to be still standing.  A former owner of the property had the wonderful idea back in the 1960’s of knocking it down so that he could get his combine harvester through it and into the courtyard – hhhmmm.  Happily for us, the mayor at the time suggested he might like to think again and the plan was reluctantly abandoned…………

Porche through garden gate_

Porche from courtyard 2Thanks as always to Norm for hosting this excellent challenge. Please click on the links to view more contributions.

ALL PHOTOS © JANE MORLEY

If you enjoy the photos on my blog please do visit my brand new website http://www.janemorley.photography where you will find many more photos and also http://www.theartcardpress.com for a host of greeting cards and photographic prints and even www.galeriedelamaison.com where you can sneak a peek at our boutique and tearoom!

 

32 Comments Add yours

  1. Norm 2.0 says:

    This is wonderful – and thank you for the kind words too. Welcome back 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Norm! Glad to be able to participate again, it’ll give me an excuse to get the camera out and about again! My best – belated – new year wishes to you!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. west517 says:

    Love ALL the doors– and the ornate, scrolling iron… beautiful– I WISH we had places like this where I live … but I have Disney… does that count??! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HaHa! I’m sure Disneyland/world must have some splendid doors, all those castles and cottages in the woods?!! 😀

      Like

  3. I love those archways.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Olga says:

    I just love your door posts and extras. The photo of the view through the metal, curled gate decor looking onto a blurred background with a turret in the distance is wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Olga, I really appreciate your comments!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautifully elegant, Jane. Great to see you back.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Janet! It’s true I’ve missed it! Really need to get out and find some new doors now, good excuse to disappear off with the camera for a morning!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Grace says:

    Beautiful choice as always, Jane! x

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Beautywhizz says:

    Love the detail photo with a tower in the background.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Beautywhizz! That’s a pigeon tower – ‘pigeonnier’- that you see a lot on the old country houses round here, used to be a way of showing off your status and wealth! This one is now an occasional home to a barn owl and a family of kestrels!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Beautywhizz says:

        I like that name pigeonnier!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. That’s my kind of porche! Thank heaven for that 1960s mayor. It doesn’t bear thinking about had the farmer had his way. Happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Sarah – glad you like it and yes at least sometimes the village mayor can come in handy! Have a lovely weekend yourself, hope it’s not cold there – it’s suddenly gone all a bit minus here bbbrrrrr!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It has been cold but it’s rather mild at the moment, thank heaven.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m wrapped up in woolies and thick socks and heading for the wood burner!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Handsome architecture. It’s good that someone rethought taking it down. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely Judy – France can be a strange place when it comes to protecting their heritage!!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Phil Taylor says:

    What beautiful photos! Love the story. I agree that doors are very symbolic and are often more fun when you don’t know what’s behind them and the possibilities are endless.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Dan Antion says:

    Great door in that stone wall. The wall is impresive too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Dan, yes I think you’d be impressed with the workmanship, the wall is part of a very long barn all built from lumps of limestone found in the fields – they certainly knew how to build in those days!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dan Antion says:

        I’m always amazed by structures like this. They knew what they needed, used what they had and it has lasted forever.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Absolutely Dan! I’m sure the same will not be true for most modern building!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. These are great Jane, and I too love a good door – you never know what is behind it until you open it. That is the mystery. BTW, just been looking at your website – your photos are superb (as is the site) 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi James, glad you like these and I’m really delighted that you like my website, your comments are much appreciated! Hope you’re having a good start to your year and not too affected by all the terrible weather we keep hearing about? 🙂

      Like

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