Thursday Doors – The Chapel of the Knights Templar, Cressac

There is something irresistibly fascinating about doors and doorways, whether old or new they seem to pique our innate curiosity and love of mystery.

I have posted a couple of times already with some of my favourites but having just discovered some other fellow door-lovers and the ‘Thursday Doors’ spot hosted by ‘Norm 2.0′ – thanks to Norm – I thought I’d join in, sorry that it’s actually Friday!

So for my first contribution here is a photo of the amazing doors of the Chapelle des Templiers – the Knight’s Templar Chapel at Cressac Saint Genis near where I live.   On the famous pilgrimage route through France down to Santiago de Compostela, the chapel dates from the second half of the 12th century and inside are the remains of a series of frescoes concerning the exploits of certain knights linked to the area. I don’t think it would actually matter what lay beyond these heavy pieces of ancient oak with their iron studs and gnarled, knotted panels – they have such extraordinary character, even with the modern keyhole sitting oddly side by side the old.  I immediately find myself drifting off into daydreams of medieval romances, castle keeps, damsels in distress and acts of splendid chivalry……………………..

 

ALL PHOTOS © JANE MORLEY
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17 Comments Add yours

  1. Lovely photo. When we were in Aix en Provence and Paris in 2013, I did a serious of doors in Aix and several other cities in the south and in Paris, as well. It’s really impossible not to photograph doors in France and Spain, and Portugal, and Italy, and…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Timothy! Glad you like the photos and you’re right there’s something about the architecture, the age and texture in the doors of these countries that makes them irresistible!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Both photos are wonderful. I just noticed photos came out singular in my first comment.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Norm 2.0 says:

    Now THAT is impressive. Thanks so much for sharing and for joining us this week. I hope to see you back whenever you feel like sharing 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you Norm! I’m so pleased you like it and yes please, I’d love to keep joining in whenever I can find something good to share 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I have the same fascination with doors. I once had so many Cretan doorway photos but then when computer and backup went doolally at the same time a couple of years ago, I lost most of them. Grrr!

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    1. Yikes that’s frustrating Sarah! I must say there are so many candidates for pics around here I should have more than I do – I intend to make it more of a project!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Grace says:

    Gorgeous door shots, Jane. I love taking shots of doors as well, especially when visiting other countries.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Grace! They are such fascinating subjects aren’t they, all that potential mystery beyond !! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. How Incredible this door neighbor the wall from mid 12th, its detail as well as its condition. As an ordinary one without art n history background, I think the design is both strong, artistic n sophisticated. I love how you capture both – – dramatic, detail, n very good work of lighting. Yes, when I look on other wordpress blog for door photos, I think doors n their surrounding bricks/woods in France might be special, always have artistic characters even the simplest n abandoned ones…

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    1. Hello idlehomemaker! Yes there is something special about the architecture here in France, perhaps just that so many old churches from this period have survived. Our region is also particularly beautiful for the limestone used in the buildings. Glad you liked them!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I do so love doors. They are the purest form of portholes to a million other worlds.
    I think, when building the house I currently live in, the item I spent the most time focusing on was each door. Some were arched, some were bricked–my favorite was a gorgeous heavy antique door I found in Mexico from some long ago dilapidated hacienda.
    Your pictures are wonderfully swoony, Jane. Right up my alley. You live in a magical kingdom, indeed!

    Like

    1. Many thanks Shelley, I agree so much with your analogy of portholes to other worlds, it is inevitably the mystery that attracts me and all that astonishing history. I love the idea that the doors in your house are varied and meaningful in some different way, it must be like having several different houses all at once!

      Like

  8. Ellie-Dee says:

    Terrific photos of doors, I love the close up showing all the ironmongery and lovely grain and texture of the wood. Such mysterious items, doors, opening up all sorts of adventures, delights or disappointments… one never knows what until walking through to the other side!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ellie! and yes I agree that mysterious aspect makes them irresistible!

      Like

  9. Wow, really beautiful door and photos!!
    Congratulations!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thankyou very much! The architecture is similar to that in one of your door posts I think.

      Like

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